Mathematics
 
All students must earn a minimum of three units of mathematics credit and pass the New York State Common Core Algebra Examination to obtain a Regents Diploma. Advanced Regents diplomas can be earned if students earn a minimum of three units of mathematics credit and pass the New York State Common Core Algebra I, Geometry Regents, and the Algebra II Regents Examinations.
 

Algebra I : 2126 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit                                                                                                         
This course is the first course in a three-year sequence aligned with the Common Core State Standards. Algebra provides tools and ways of thinking that are necessary for solving problems in a wide variety of disciplines, such as science, business, social sciences, fine arts, and technology. This course will assist students in developing skills and processes to be applied using a variety of techniques to successfully solve problems in a variety of settings. Topics include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, solving equations and inequalities, and statistics, as outlined in the NYS Common Core Standards. The course concludes with the Algebra I Regents examination in June.
 
Intermediate Algebra : 2331 : 40 weeks : 1 Credit     Prerequisite: Passed Algebra I Regents
This course can serve as the second course for students who need to continue the study of mathematics and obtain a 2nd or 3rd mathematics credit. The course includes work with linear and quadratic equations, absolute value equations and inequalities, polynomials, sequences, linear systems, radicals, and pattern recognition and description. Emphasis will be placed on topics that will help each student prepare for college placement testing and/or a 3rd math course.
 
Geometry : 2432 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit    Prerequisite: Passed Algebra I
This course is intended to be the second course in mathematics for high school students. Within this course, students will have the opportunity to make conjectures about geometric situations and prove in a variety of ways, both formal and informal, that their conclusion follows logically from their hypothesis. This course is meant to employ an integrated approach to the study of geometric relationships. Integrating synthetic, transformational, and coordinate approaches to geometry, students will justify geometric relationships and properties of geometric figures. Congruence and similarity of triangles will be established using appropriate theorems. Transformations including rotations, reflections, translations, and glide reflections and coordinate geometry will be used to establish and verify geometric relationships. A major emphasis of this course is to allow students to investigate geometric situations. Properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles should receive particular attention. It is intended that students will use the traditional tools of compass and straightedge as well as dynamic geometry software that models these tools more efficiently and accurately, to assist in these investigations. Geometry is meant to lead students to an understanding that reasoning and proof are fundamental aspects of mathematics and something that sets it apart from the other sciences. Additionally, this course culminates in a NYS Regents Examination.
 
Algebra II : 2332 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit                                                                                                        
This course is the capstone course of the three units of credit required for an Advanced Regents diploma. This course is a continuation and extension of the two courses that preceded it. While developing the algebraic techniques that will be required of those students that continue their study of mathematics, this course is also intended to continue developing alternative solution strategies and algorithms. For example, technology can provide to many students the means to address a problem situation to which they might not otherwise have access. Within this course, the number system will be extended to include imaginary and complex numbers. The families of functions to be studied will include polynomial, absolute value, radical, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Problem situations involving direct and indirect variation will be solved. Problems resulting in systems of equations will be solved graphically and algebraically. Algebraic techniques will be developed to facilitate rewriting mathematical expressions into multiple equivalent forms. Data analysis will be extended to include measures of dispersion and the analysis of regression that model functions studied throughout this course. Associated correlation coefficients will be determined, using technology tools and interpreted as a measure of strength of the relationship. Arithmetic and geometric sequences will be expressed in multiple forms, and arithmetic and geometric series will be evaluated. Binomial experiments will provide the basis for the study of probability theory and the normal probability distribution will be analyzed and used as an approximation for these binomial experiments. Right triangle trigonometry will be expanded to include the investigation of circular functions. Problem situations requiring the use of trigonometric equations and identities will also be investigated.
 
Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry : 2431 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit        Prerequisite: Passed Algebra II
This course is designed for students who desire additional math credits for college preparation. The course will allow students to develop and apply trigonometric formulas in the solution of triangular problems. It will also review basic algebra and develop skills in the area of functions: linear, quadratic, and exponential. Much of the course will center on algebraic skills used in the solution of algebraic and trigonometric equations. This course will strengthen a student’s skills with high school algebra and trigonometry and prepare a student for continued work at the college level. Graphing calculators are required for the course. This course is not designed to prepare students for the Algebra II Regents Examination.
 
Pre-Calculus (OCC MAT 143) : 2445 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit                                                                      
Prerequisite: We recommend that a student pass Algebra II and Algebra II Regents exam
Pre-Calculus is designed to prepare students for their first course in calculus and other college courses in mathematics. The majority of content is centered on topics dealing with functions, both polynomial and rational. Special functions such as irrational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions are developed using the graphing calculator. Advanced mathematical areas, such as limits and derivatives of functions, as well as sequences and series are studied. Each student is required to have a graphing calculator for the course. Course is offered for optional college credit through OCC.
 
Calculus (OCC MAT 161) : 2435 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit                                                                             
Prerequisite: Passed Pre-Calculus
This course is designed for students wishing to continue their study of mathematics after Pre-Calculus but not wanting to take AP Calculus. This course contains, but is not limited in, the following topics: differential and integral calculus, applications of calculus to curve sketching and problems of Physics, conic sections and advanced methods of integration.  Each student is required to have a graphing calculator.  Course is offered for optional college credit through OCC.

Intro to Statistics : 2516 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit
This course is an alternative third course in mathematics for high school students.  It is designed to focus on an introduction to probability and statistics as applicable to real-world situations and professions.  Topics to include graphic representation of data, randomness and probability, normal distributions, measures of central tendency, experimental design and analysis of current real-world data.
 
Advanced Placement Statistics : 2517 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit                                                                      
Prerequisite: Passed Algebra II Regents Exam, passed Pre-Calculus or passed Intro to Statistics
The Advanced Placement Statistics course is an excellent option for a student who has successfully completed a 3 year Regents sequence in mathematics and is pursuing additional course work in science, engineering, business or mathematics. The topics for Advanced Placement Statistics explore four major themes: 1) Exploratory Analysis of Data - study of patterns and departure of patterns using graphical and numerical techniques 2) Planning a Study - deciding what and how to measure data 3) Anticipatory Patterns - producing models using probability and simulation 4) Statistic Inference - conforming models using statistical inference guides. Students may be enrolled concurrently in any Calculus course or Pre-Calculus. All students enrolled in this course must take the Advanced Placement exam given in May. Also, each student must have a graphing calculator. A fee will be charged for the AP exam.
 
Advanced Placement (OCC MAT 161) Calculus AB : 2518 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit
Prerequisite: Passed Pre-Calculus with Mastery or above
This course is designed for students expecting to enter engineering, Math or Science related fields: i.e., Medical, Statistician, etc. and who wish to take a college level course. This course introduces and develops Calculus and Analytical Geometry. One purpose of the course is to prepare for the Advanced Placement exam offered in the spring. A fee will be charged for the AP exam. All students must take this exam and upon successful completion, obtain advanced placement in most colleges and universities. This course contains, but is not limited in, the following topics: differential and integral calculus, application of calculus to curve sketching and problems of Physics, conic sections and advanced methods of integration. Each student is required to have a graphing calculator. Course is offered through optional College Credit through OCC.
 
Advanced Placement (OCC MAT 161) Calculus BC : 2437 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit
Prerequisite: Passed Pre-Calculus with Mastery or above and with teacher recommendation
This course is designed for students planning to enter engineering, Mathematics or Science related fields: i.e. Medical, Statistician, etc. who wish to take an Advanced Placement college level class. This course is equivalent to a two semester college course. The Calculus BC course is intended for students whose prior studies and success in Pre-Calculus eliminate the need for the review of basic functions included in Calculus AB. This course introduces and develops Calculus and Analytical Geometry. This course covers both AB Calculus and BC Calculus in one year. It prepares students to take the BC Calculus exam in May. Students who take the Calculus BC exam will be scored on both the AB and BC exams. A fee will be charged for the AP exam and all students must take the exam. This course contains but is not limited to: differential and integral calculus, application of calculus to curve sketching and problems in physics, conic sections, Taylor Series, polynomial approximations and series, parametric, polar and vector functions, logistic growth, Euler’s Method, integration by parts and other BC topics.
 
Math/Science/Technology : 3500 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit
Prerequisite: Earned 2 Math credits and 2 science credits prior to enrollment and passed 1 math and 1 science Regents examination
This course is designed to meet the need of a third math or third science credit. The purpose of this course is to ensure the use of problem-solving techniques in order to increase students’ understanding that Math, Science and Technology are inherently interactive and are an integral part of society. This course is designed to have a thematic approach to real world problems. Possible themes include transportation, mechanical systems, energy, toys, medicine, health and wellness, communication, electronics, home, and engineering and design. The course will conclude with a culminating project.
 
Math Topics (Seniors Only) : 2325 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit
Prerequisite: Passed two math classes (This course is used as third or fourth credit for seniors).
This course is designed for seniors who choose not to study at the depth and pace required for Algebra II (Common Core). Throughout the course emphasis is placed on mathematical skills as they relate to personal finance such as filing taxes, budgeting, bills, and understanding the use of credit. This course benefits college-bound students regardless of their mathematical intentions for the future.
 
PLTW- MATHEMATICS

PLTW- Computer Science Essentials / Introduction to Computer Science : 2955 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit                                 
This course is designed to be the first computer science course for students who have never programmed before.  It is a fun, foundational course that helps prepare students for success in the PLTW Computer Science program.  In PLTW Computer Science Essentials, students will experience the major topics, big ideas, and computational thinking practices used by computing professionals to solve problems and create value for others. They will use a visual programming language and advance to text-based programming.  Throughout the course, students will have opportunities to apply computational thinking practices and collaborate just as computing professionals do to create products that address topics and problems important to them.  This is a hands-on course.  Students will work in teams to create solutions and problem-solve.  This course is only offered at Durgee Junior High
 
PLTW -Computer Science Principles : 6433 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit                                                                             
Prerequisite: Algebra I Examination with an 80% average is suggested                                                                                    
Open
doors in any career with computer science.  Students create apps for mobile devices, automate tasks in a variety of languages, find patterns in data, and interpret simulations. Students collaborate to create and present solutions that can improve people’s lives. How will computing and connectivity transform your world: Unit 1: Algorithms, Graphics, and Graphical User Interfaces (48%) Unit 2: The Internet (18%) Unit 3: Raining Reigning Data (17%) Unit 4: Intelligent Behavior (17%) This course is highly recommended for students interested in careers in computer science, engineering, or business. This course will require strong reading and logic/reasoning skills. Students who take this course will be eligible to take the College Board’s Advanced Placement CSP test.
 
PLTW_Computer Science Applications : 6434 : 40 Weeks : 1 Credit
Prerequisite: Passed Computer Science Principles or C++
This course is the second course in the PLTW Computer Science Pathway. We currently offer the first course. CSA focuses on integrating technologies across multiple platforms and networks, including the Internet. Students collaborate to produce programs that integrate mobile devices and leverage those devices for distributed collection and data processing. Students analyze, adapt, and improve each other’s programs while working primarily in Java™ and other industry-standard tools. This course prepares students for the College Board’s Advanced Placement CS-A test and aligns with CSTA Level 3C Standards. Students who take this course will be eligible to take College Board’s Advanced Placement CS-A test.

PLTW Cybersecurity:  6435: 40 Weeks : 1 Credit
Prerequisite: Previously taken at least one computer science class or C++
Cybersecurity introduces the tools and concepts of cybersecurity and encourages students to create solutions that allow people to share computing resources while protecting privacy. Nationally, computational resources are vulnerable and frequently attacked; in Cybersecurity, students solve problems by understanding and closing these vulnerabilities. This course raises students’ knowledge of and commitment to ethical computing behavior. It also aims to develop students’ skills as consumers, friends, citizens, and employees who can effectively contribute to communities with a dependable cyber-infrastructure that moves and processes information safely.

 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Last updated on 1/15/2018